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Heartbreak

Today we are going to write poems about heartbreak. Form is up to you, but the theme must be heartbreak (or ache). Partially inspired by The Handbook of Heartbreak: 101 Poems of Lost Love and Sorrow, compiled by Robert Pinksy. Advertisements

11

Write one of these… Quoted from Wikipedia: Hendecasyllable verse (in Italian endecasillabo) is a kind of verse used mostly in Italian poetry, defined by its having the last stress on the tenth syllable. When, as often happens, this stress falls on the last but one syllable, the line has exactly eleven syllables (and the literal […]

No E

Lipogram: a composition in which the writer systematically omits a certain letter or letters of the alphabet. Pick your favorite form, or even free verse, and write a lipogram. Or take a poem you have already written and adapt it. This sounds easy, I’ll just leave out ‘x’, but no my friends I add a […]

Apologies

I like apology letter poems such as William Carlos Williams’ This is Just to Say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast. Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold. (and songs like the Decemberists Apology Song. Let’s write some of those. Original post […]

You Rhyme? EYE Rhyme!

As a break from syllable counting (which I greatly enjoy), write a poem using any rhyme scheme or form you’d like (ABAB, AABB, ABA, etc.), but the poem must be an Eye Rhyme, where it rhymes visually, but not aurally. An example: Young Dick, always eager to eat, Denied stealing the fish eggs, whereat Caning him for a […]

Cinquain

Apparently I like to count syllables… The cinquain was invented by Adelaide Crapsey, she was inspired by Japanese poetry to develop her own system (as an aside, what do people think about the idea of creating and defining a system/form of poetry? Is it something you think is pretentious, or useful, or needs the authority of someone […]

Tanka Truck

Tanka “are mood pieces, usually about love, the shortness of life, the seasons, or sadness. Tanka use strong images and may employ the poetic devices, such as metaphor and personification, that haiku avoid.”* Japanese poetry like haiku, tankas, chokas, etc. are not really properly matched by English syllables but because it’s easier to specify a […]